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Thursday, September 8

  1. page Inquiry 4 Influences of the Declaration of Independence edited ... == Public Opinion ... been {http://img.tfd.com/WEAL/weal_09_img1688.jpg} allowed http:/…
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    ==
    Public Opinion
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    been {http://img.tfd.com/WEAL/weal_09_img1688.jpg} allowedhttp://img.tfd.com/WEAL/weal_09_img1688.jpgallowed to speak
    Works Cited
    John Locke (1632-1704). Oregon State University, n.d. Web. 5 Sept. 2011.
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    6:50 am

Wednesday, September 7

  1. page Inquiry 12 Federalists and AntiFederalists edited ... The Federalists believed that most of the power should be placed in a central government that …
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    The Federalists believed that most of the power should be placed in a central government that could run all the colonies, not just local governments running themselves. {constitution.jpg} (Gale) By having a control over them all, the government could collect the taxes and enforce the laws properly. (Gale) The Anti-federalists believed that if the national government had too much power over the people then laws would be made without the people’s consent. (Gale) They concerned themselves with the ideas that with a new government it would over shadow states’ rights and an individual’s liberties. (Gale)
    Checks and Balances
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    James Madison. (Gale)
    Key People
    Alexander Hamilton and James Madison
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    6:09 am
  2. page Inquiry 13 edited Inquiry 13: What were the key features of the Constitution? Include the Great Compromise, separatio…
    Inquiry 13: What were the key features of the Constitution? Include the Great Compromise, separation of powers, limited government, and the issue of slavery.
    Gage Grim, Chase Tetpon, and Stephen Newberry
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    state legislatures. Each
    {http://www.graves.k12.ky.us/schools/gcms/academic_team/Academic%20Team%20Branches%20of%20Government%20Study%20Guide_files/image001.jpg} All of the branches have to abide to the constitution
    Each
    state will
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    in his life."; proposedlife.";proposed the alternative
    The constitution was written during a time that the people wanted away from the dictatorship of a mother country. This is evident in the provisions that they made within the constitution. Our current government is divided into three parts; the Judicial, Legislative and Executive Branches. Each of which have a function in the government and serve as a limiter to the power of the other branches. The Legislative Branch, also known as Congress, is made up of the House of Representitives and the Senate. They make laws for our country. The Executive Branch, headed by the President, enforces these laws. And finaly the Judicial Branch, which is the Supreme Court, acts as the highest court and checks if the laws are Constitutional. This idea to separate the powers of the government is to prevent there from being one absolute ruler, like a king. Even this group of branches, which is known as the Federal Government, is further limited by the addition of each states own government. This is all from the writers of the constitutions want for order without dictatorship.
    When slavery was mentioned in the constitution, some people thought that it should be ended. But this wasn't a completely universal idea in the colonies. At the time all the states constitution except Georgia forbade slave trade, if not owning slaves. The reason Georgia didn’t is because they need them to work in the rice patties or other large plantations. But the Founding Fathers, who were already facing the might of the King, decided they needed to have all people united. So, in order to keep peace among their own allies they just left it out of the constitution to be dealt with later. Which wouldnt't be till January 31, 1865; when the 13th amendment was passed.
    {thumbnailCAGMVC40.jpg}
    {http://www.graves.k12.ky.us/schools/gcms/academic_team/Academic%20Team%20Branches%20of%20Government%20Study%20Guide_files/image001.jpg} All of the branches have to abide to the constitution
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    6:08 am
  3. page Inquiry 2 British Acts and Proclamations edited ... The Stamp Act- The stamp act was the first act that truly caused tension between the colonists…
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    The Stamp Act- The stamp act was the first act that truly caused tension between the colonists and England. {stamp2_14518_lg.gif} {3693871.jpg} It was a taxation that was placed on all paper goods, which made any legal transaction very difficult. The colonists felt that this taxation was unfair and the transactions that they had to make in order to get legal papers ratified were too lengthy. In protest the colonies formed the Stamp Act Congress which legally protested the stamp act and sent letters to parliament asking them to repeal the taxation. Parliament denied the stamp act congress’s plea and let the taxation continue. In contrast however the Sons of Liberty, a radical revolutionary group, protested the act by menacing the British merchants and officials in America. With all of the officials fearing for their life the acts could not be properly enforced, so upon the cry for help of the merchants and officials parliament repealed the act. In response to the colonists getting their way and repealing the stamp act, parliament passed the declaratory act. This act stated the parliament had the ability to pass and enforce any laws that they wanted on to the colonies. This would prove to be an act that parliament would use many times in the near future and anger the colonists.
    The Intolerable Acts: Were Four Acts passed by Parliament to punish American Colonists for the Boston Tea Party.
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    Boston because
    {http://www.theworldsgreatbooks.com/Acts%20of%20Parliament/parliament%20truce%20act.jpg} http://www.theworldsgreatbooks.com/Acts%20of%20Parliament/parliament%20stamp%20act.jpg
    trade was a major part of the economy in Massachusetts.
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    Proclamation of 1763: After the French and Indian War, England not only received new land for their empire but also many problems to deal with. Since the new territories past the Appalachian Mountains were filled with Native Americans, who the colonists did not get along with, the King made a decision to setup a boundary along the Appalachians that the colonists could not settle past. This boundary was part of the law that was known as the Proclamation of 1763. It also placed much of French Canada within the province of Quebec, the former Spanish colony of Florida was divided into East and West Florida, and the Caribbean conquests were combined into the province of Grenada. However, the boundary line across the Appalachians affected the colonists the most and angered them greatly. Many of the colonists were already settled past the boundary, and the fact that a king an ocean away was trying to control where they lived only fueled the fire that eventually led to the American Revolution in 1776.
    {http://media.ourstory.com/43/09/92/94fd4babfb66f93578e1aaa94377c637bd21a633/b7624ca747cc476046522689e81b9996817514d4.jpg} Proclamation of 1763 http://www.ourstory.com/thread.html?t=541892

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    5:36 am

Tuesday, September 6

  1. page Inquiry 7 Influence of New England edited ... A second part that is usually associated with the Intolerable Act is the Quebec Act. The Quebe…
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    A second part that is usually associated with the Intolerable Act is the Quebec Act. The Quebec Act was established in 1774; this act organized the land that was received in Canada from the French (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). The act stated that Roman Catholicism would be the official religion, there would be a government without representative assembly, and the Quebec boundary would extend to the Ohio River (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). However, many of the colonists resented this act. Many saw this act as a way for the Britons to punish the colonies. The main reasons to why the colonies saw this act as punishment were because the Britons allowed the French to live in large boundaries and allowed the French to practice Catholicism (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). The colonist also feared that the Britons would make similar laws and take away their representative government (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). In fact, the colonists saw the Quebec Act as much {Scrapbook_for_Events.jpg} as a punishment as the Intolerable Acts. Therefore, this act played as major as a component to the Revolution.
    Gaspee
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    (“Gaspee incident”). {Slide1.JPG} Therefore, the
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    The citizens’ {Slide1.JPG} plan included
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    guilty (“Gaspee {gas.jpg} incident”). All
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    British handled {gas.jpg} the colonies
    Enlightenment
    {Slide3.JPG} TheThe Enlightenment period
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    to the {Slide3.JPG} Enlightenment period
    
    Works Cited
    (view changes)
    5:39 pm
  2. page Inquiry 7 Influence of New England edited ... A second part that is usually associated with the Intolerable Act is the Quebec Act. The Quebe…
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    A second part that is usually associated with the Intolerable Act is the Quebec Act. The Quebec Act was established in 1774; this act organized the land that was received in Canada from the French (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). The act stated that Roman Catholicism would be the official religion, there would be a government without representative assembly, and the Quebec boundary would extend to the Ohio River (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). However, many of the colonists resented this act. Many saw this act as a way for the Britons to punish the colonies. The main reasons to why the colonies saw this act as punishment were because the Britons allowed the French to live in large boundaries and allowed the French to practice Catholicism (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). The colonist also feared that the Britons would make similar laws and take away their representative government (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). In fact, the colonists saw the Quebec Act as much {Scrapbook_for_Events.jpg} as a punishment as the Intolerable Acts. Therefore, this act played as major as a component to the Revolution.
    Gaspee
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    guilty (“Gaspee {gas.jpg} incident”). All
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    colonists’ affairs. {Slide3.JPG} The new
    Enlightenment
    The{Slide3.JPG} The Enlightenment period
    
    Works Cited
    (view changes)
    5:38 pm
  3. file gas.jpg uploaded
    5:37 pm
  4. page Inquiry 7 Influence of New England edited ... A second part that is usually associated with the Intolerable Act is the Quebec Act. The Quebe…
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    A second part that is usually associated with the Intolerable Act is the Quebec Act. The Quebec Act was established in 1774; this act organized the land that was received in Canada from the French (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). The act stated that Roman Catholicism would be the official religion, there would be a government without representative assembly, and the Quebec boundary would extend to the Ohio River (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). However, many of the colonists resented this act. Many saw this act as a way for the Britons to punish the colonies. The main reasons to why the colonies saw this act as punishment were because the Britons allowed the French to live in large boundaries and allowed the French to practice Catholicism (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). The colonist also feared that the Britons would make similar laws and take away their representative government (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy 133). In fact, the colonists saw the Quebec Act as much {Scrapbook_for_Events.jpg} as a punishment as the Intolerable Acts. Therefore, this act played as major as a component to the Revolution.
    Gaspee
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    the Gaspee (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schmalbach 66 ). The Gaspee
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    the Britons (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schlmalbah 66). One of
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    the Gaspee (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schmalbac 66). Once on
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    in England (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schlmalbac 66). However, there
    Enlightenment
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    perfect union” (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schmalbach 68). This idea
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    hang separately” (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schmalbach 68). This quote
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    and property” (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schmalbach 68). Also, these
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    and property” (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schmalbach 68). For example,
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    Treaties of Government”, LockeGovernment”,Locke demanded that
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    their rights (Baily, Cohen, Kennedy).(Newman, Schmalbach 68). This idea
    
    Works Cited
    (view changes)
    5:34 pm

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